Edit ModuleShow Tags

We love malihini, (newcomers, if you happen to be one). We welcome you with open arms and flower lei. Don’t be surprised if people you’ve just met start calling you aunty or uncle—we treat everyone like family here. Hawai‘i’s warm hospitality has earned us the nickname the Aloha State. Aloha has many meanings, but above all, it means love. We show our aloha in many ways, like when we shaka to each other as a way of saying thanks when driving. 

 

Newcomers fall in love with the place, and many end up staying for good, and become kama‘āina (devoted longtime residents, or locals). Hawai‘i is constantly changing and developing, and we want to introduce you to everything our Island home has to offer—beyond the beaches and waterfalls in the tourist pictures. We’re a burgeoning hub of teachers and professors, tech entrepreneurs, scientists, chefs, fashion designers and more. There’s a lot to see, taste and do here. At HONOLULU Magazine, we strive to be your user’s guide for the city, pointing you toward everything you need to make your life in Honolulu the best it can be. So dive in and read up on everything you need to know to become a true kama‘āina.

 

American Savings Bank is proud to present this Newcomer’s Guide. We are a leading and locally owned financial institution that has helped make dreams possible for island residents and businesses for more than 90 years.  Our strength comes from helping customers succeed and supporting the communities where we live.  From all of us here: Aloha! E komo mai (that means, welcome) to your new home.

                                                                                                                                              

Edit ModuleShow Tags

MORE »Where to Live

The Ultimate Newcomer’s Guide to Living on O‘ahu

New to the island? Here’s what you need to know.

Neighborhood of the Month: Kapolei

(Sponsored) From your neighborhood experts at Locations.

Honolulu Rent Prices: We’re Lucky No. 13

It’s no surprise Honolulu’s one of the most expensive cities in the nation. But it’s not all bad news.
Edit ModuleShow Tags

MORE »Professional Services

The Best Real Estate Professionals in Hawai‘i 2018

Buying a home in Hawai‘i might be the biggest investment you’ll ever make. Get expert help from the top agents and brokers listed here.

The Best Dentists in Hawai‘i 2018

HONOLULU Magazine helps you find the dentist you need, whether it’s for a routine checkup or more specialized work. Everyone on this list comes highly recommended by other dentists, who know their work best.

The Best Lawyers in Hawai‘i 2018

The number of legal practice areas here—91!—attests, life is complicated. But there’s no need to face those complications without an advocate.
Edit ModuleShow Tags

MORE »Hawaiian History

Quote Unquote: Meet the Aloha Festivals Floral Parade's Pā‘ū Rider

Representing the island of Kaho‘olawe, Faith Kalamau marks her third year participating as a pā‘ū princess in the annual Waikīkī parade.

King Kamehameha III Statue Unveiled on Hawaiian Sovereignty Restoration Day

The 12-foot-tall bronze statue dedication took place at Thomas Square in Honolulu in honor of the 175th anniversary of Lā Ho‘iho‘i Ea.

O‘ahu Walking Tour: Discover Hale‘iwa’s Most Iconic Historic Sites

We try walking tours that uncover O‘ahu’s rich history and culture.
Edit ModuleShow Tags

MORE »Leisure

Your Guide to the Perfect Weekend in Honolulu: Sept. 22–23, 2018

Have a rice day at Ward, play a classic board game and take the keiki west for an afternoon of fun.

Your Guide to the Perfect Weekend in Honolulu: Sept. 14–16, 2018

Watch a scintillating burlesque show, shop one-of-a-kind local furniture and walk to defeat ALS.

The 8 Best Things to Do in September 2018

Jam out with reggae artists, walk for a cure and laugh your head off with Trevor Noah this month.
Edit ModuleShow Tags

MORE »Dining

First Look: Rangoon Burmese Kitchen

Honolulu’s newest Burmese restaurant hits high marks with an extensive menu of curries, salads, soups, rice dishes and more.

Chef Chris Oh’s Chingu Hawai‘i Brings L.A.’s K-Town Vibe to Honolulu

Plus, find out what the restaurateur will be making at this year’s Hawai‘i Food and Wine Festival.

These “Nachos in Paradise” Bloggers Are Eating All the Nachos on O‘ahu

This is nacho average group of diners.
Edit ModuleShow Tags

MORE »Local Culture

How Honolulu Gets Its Street Names and Neighborhood Themes

Streets named after flowers, birds, clouds—tell us your neighborhood theme!

Quote Unquote: Meet the Aloha Festivals Floral Parade's Pā‘ū Rider

Representing the island of Kaho‘olawe, Faith Kalamau marks her third year participating as a pā‘ū princess in the annual Waikīkī parade.

Your Ultimate Guide to the 2018 Okinawan Festival in Honolulu

Spend your Labor Day weekend, Sept. 1 and 2, stuffing your face while soaking in Okinawan culture.
Edit ModuleShow Tags

MORE »Resources

Check It Out: Hawai‘i’s Public Library System Offers Way More Than Just Books

Books make up the backbone of the only statewide library system in the U.S., but there’s a lot more to Hawai‘i libraries—including apps, online classes and digital books.

Best of Honolulu 2018

Discover all the 2018 Best of Honolulu winners—both editorial and reader picks.

Best of Honolulu 2018: Family

The 5 editorial and reader picks for the best for you and your ʻohana.
Edit ModuleShow Tags

MORE »Education

Here’s How Hawai‘i Schools Are Encouraging Students to Follow Their Passions

Molding kids into well-rounded students no longer means just checking a list of activities. Educators are encouraging students to follow their passions for nature, volunteering, music and more, resulting in more meaningful and creative learning.

How Did Hawai‘i’s Public Schools Rank in 2016–2017?

We’ve ranked Hawai‘i’s public schools from the best-performing to the worst, using official state Department of Education data. How does your school measure up?

How Hawai‘i’s Schools Are Tackling Chronic Absenteeism

A prime predictor of future economic and emotional instability, and even prison time, chronic absenteeism affects large numbers of Hawai‘i public school students. Last school year, nearly 27,000 students got in trouble for missing too much school. Helping them show up consistently will take a community effort.