Hawaii Education: Q&A with Don Horner and Kathryn Matayoshi


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For more than a decade, HONOLULU Magazine has critically examined the state’s public education system. As part of this year's coverage, Associate Editor Tiffany Hill sat down with Kathryn Matayoshi, the state Department of Education superintendent, and Don Horner, the Board of Education chair, two of the most influential people when it comes to Hawaii's public education.

The questions for this exclusive, video Q&A come from both the magazine staff and the public, and touch on a variety of subjects, such as what the department and board are doing to reverse negative public perceptions, how teacher evaluations will work, whether or not Matayoshi and Horner sent their children to public school and more. Visit honolulumagazine.com for additional public education coverage.

We segmented the video Q&A into eight clips, each corresponding with a question. To hear their answer on a particular question, click that video's play button. Or, click here to view the entire video.

 

1) What is the DOE doing to retain new talented teachers and to remove poorly performing ones?

Click the play button to hear the answer to this question, or click here to open a new tab.

 

2) Is there a disconnect between the DOE and Board administration and what's going on at the classroom level?

Click the play button to hear the answer to this question, or click here to open a new tab.

 

3) What is the DOE and BOE doing to reverse that negative perception that many Hawaii parents have about public education?

Click the play button to hear the answer to this question, or click here to open a new tab.

 

4) Did you send your children to public school and if not, then why?

Click the play button to hear the answer to this question, or  click here to open a new tab.

 

5) What kind of support and training is given to principals and their administrators?

Click the play button to hear the answer to this question, or click here to open a new tab.

 

6) How does the DOE extend the best practices of successful schools to those that are floundering?

Click the play button to hear the answer to this question, or click here to open a new tab.

 

7) How are the BOE and DOE helping schools that have a lot of new programs in place maintain consistency?

Click the play button to hear the answer to this question, or click here to open a new tab.

 

8) In your opinion, what is the role of the teacher, and how are evaluation measurements going to gauge teacher engagement with their students?

Click the play button to hear the answer to this question, or click here to open a new tab.

 

Want to read more of our education coverage from May 2012? Check out the links below.

A Tale of Two Schools in Hawaii

From Iolani School to Moanalua High School: A Parents’ Tale

Q&A: How is the DOE helping poor-performing schools?

Q&A: What do schools have in place to ensure communication with parents?

Q&A: Why don't all public schools have midterms and final exam weeks?

Q&A: Why don't student representatives get a vote?

Q&A: Kamehameha Schools Focuses on Public Schools Along the Waianae Coast

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