Edit ModuleShow Tags

Liliha Moments


Published:

(page 1 of 4)

For four years, photographer Paul Chesley has documented the Honolulu neighborhood of Liliha for calendars published by state Rep. Corinne Ching. Her district includes Liliha, where she makes her home, and the calendars are a labor of love for the freelance National Geographic Society photographer and the representative, who produces them without state funds as as gifts and promotional tools. These photographs, taken between 2005 and 2008, capture a historic neighborhood in all its complexity.

Plantation Home, Kunawai Lane “Corinne and I drove by this house, and I said, ‘we need to stop so I can shoot this,’” says Chesley. “I’ve spent a lot of time on outer islands so I’m used to seeing plantation-style homes with their beautiful shapes, but you don’t see them a lot in Honolulu. Sadly enough, they’ve been torn down.” The man on the porch is the nephew of the person who built the home, adds  Ching.

 

Royal Mausoleum, Nuuanu Avenue  Known as Mauna Ala (fragrant hills) in Hawaiian, the Royal Hawaiian Mausoleum has a curator, Bill Maioho, who lives on the grounds. His position is an inherited one, stemming from tradition in the alii class. His mother held the position for 28 years, his grandfather, for 10. Chief Hoolulu was his sixth great-grandfather.

 

Young’s Noodle Factory, Liliha Street Flour lightly coats the concrete floor like a sheet of fresh snow. Sounds of clanging pans can be heard in the distance. The tempting smell of fried noodles escapes onto bustling Liliha Street. When restaurants or nearby residents need noodles—of any kind, from yee mein to saimin—they go to Young’s Noodle Factory. In the back sit archaic-looking metal machines and, on a recent morning, dozens of 5-inch deep trays held a mess of chow mein.
 

Edit ModuleShow Tags Edit ModuleShow Tags Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module

Subscribe to Honolulu

Honolulu Magazine December 2018
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Trending

 

9 Greatest Honolulu Homes

Great Homes

Stunning, historic, extraordinary.

 

Can the Mainland Do Poke Right? Do We Want Them To?​

Poke

Martha Cheng, author of The Poke Cookbook and former line, talks about how a New York City publisher decided Hawai‘i’s favorite pūpū was for everybody.

 

50 Essential Hawai‘i Books You Should Read in Your Lifetime

Books

The most iconic, trenchant and irresistible island books, as voted by a panel of literary community luminaries.

 

Everything You Need to Know About Local Fruit in Hawai‘i

Fruit

Fruits are part of our history and culture, a way for us to feel connected to our community.

 

 

A Local’s Guide to Buying Reef-Safe Sunscreen

Sunscreen

Five Hawai‘i brands have created reef-safe sunscreens that are safe for your ʻohana and the ocean. 

Edit ModuleShow Tags