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Meet the Honolulu Zoo’s Newborn Sloth

It might be time to visit the zoo.


Published:

sloth mom eats corn with baby sloth baby close up
Photos: City and County of Honolulu

 

The Honolulu Zoo’s southern two-toed sloth ‘ohana just got bigger.

 

A name will have to wait because the baby is too young for the zoo’s staff to determine its sex. The 4-day-old, born on Monday, Sept. 18, is the third sloth born at the zoo to mother Harriet and father Quando.

 

The baby can be seen on public display with its mother. Sloth offspring stay with their mothers for 9 to 12 months. The older sisters, ‘Opihi and ‘Ākala, can be seen on display with the father.

 

The parents are part of the Association of Zoos & Aquarium’s Species Survival Program.

 

Wild two-toed sloths have a lifespan of 15 to 20 years and typically have an extended lifespan in captivity. These nocturnal animals sleep for 16 to 18 hours a day eating a diet of leaves and fruit.

 

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Honolulu Magazine November 2018
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