Subleasing can be a good transition option


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Life can sometimes put you in an awkward situation in which you’re without a home for a few months. Maybe you had to move out sooner than you expected, and your new home isn’t ready yet; maybe you’re renovating and can’t be in your space for an extended period. Maybe you’re only in town for a few months to do a project.

Whatever the reason, there are times when a hotel is too expensive, but a long-term lease is too long. You may want to think about subleasing a space during your transition—it could be an opportunity to live in a different neighborhood, or simply meet new people.

This ad came through Craigslist last week to fill two spaces from April 1 and May 1 through August 31, and sounded like such a cool place to live, I wanted to check it out for this blog. As it turns out, I know the roomies from Twitter: @TaraZirker and @Frayed_Laces. (I didn’t know this, but Tara has also worked for HONOLULU Magazine.)

It’s a good Nuuanu neighborhood, but the house itself looks kind of sketchy from the outside—even the neighbors were afraid to visit. Once inside, though, you can see how cute it is, with three bedrooms and a bathroom, all with stylish accent walls.

You don’t even have to bring any furniture, as it’s fully furnished. The roomies also promise that it’s “stocked with everything you could possibly need for a few months of Hawaii living.”

Considering the convenient, quaint neighborhood and the inclusions—rent, utilities, wifi, cable TV, covered parking—$650 per month is quite reasonable.

And now that I’ve met the roommates in person, I can say that they’re a big part of the reason the inside of the home is so cute. Here’s a video of them in their home, talking about what their neighborhood is like (click below to launch the video):

They prefer another female roommate but say, “Dudes, if you think this is a good fit, feel free to make your case!” Maybe now that their neighbors can see the sketchy-looking home has decent inhabitants, they won’t feel intimidated to visit.

Click here to see the listing and contact information.

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