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Things to Do in March in Hawaii


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photo illustration: david croxford

 

 

Fore!

03/10

A favorite among residents and tourists alike, the Ala Wai Golf Course holds the Guinness World Record for the world’s busiest golf course. “It’s nonstop busy here,” says range manager Jeff Ferry, who notes that 5:30 to 9:30 pm is particularly popular on the driving range (seen in the photo), when avid golfers come in to get their practice shots done before dinner. Even professional golfer Mark Calcavecchia practices his backswings here. Located on Kapahulu Avenue and Ala Wai Boulevard, the course is open daily at 6 a.m. and the driving range is open until 11:45 p.m. --Mariah Schiaretti

 

 


Icy Moves

Mar. 6-7


Witness the enchanting adaptation of Hans Christian Anderson’s The Snow Queen at the Hawaii Theatre. This visually impressive musical weaves the story of the boy captured by the wicked Snow Queen and the girl who must rescue him before his heart turns to ice. For tickets and more information, visit hawaiitheatre.com.
 

Celebrate Honolulu

Mar. 12-14

Take part in the 16th annual Honolulu Festival. This three-day celebration includes festivities at the Hawaii Convention Center, Ala Moana Center and Waikiki Beach Walk. More than 5,000 people attend each year and the festival concludes with a parade down Kalakaua Avenue. Visit honolulufestival.org.
 

Beer Fest

Mar. 13

Head to the Big Island this weekend for beer, beer and more beer at the 15th annual Kona Brewers Festival. The festival features the products of 30 Hawaii and Mainland breweries, serving 60 types of beer. Local restaurants will also serve food to complement the beer. Patrons can also listen to live music and watch hula performances. Visit konabrewersfestival.com.
 

 

 

Groovy Tunes

Mar. 14-Apr. 4

Take a step back in musical time during Shout! at the Diamond Head Theatre. The musical features tunes from the 1960s, complete with flower-child costumes. Visit diamondheadtheatre.com for tickets and more information. 

 
 

Impressive Ikebana

Mar. 22-26

Appreciate the art of traditional Japanese floral arrangements at “Splendors of Ikebana 2010: Traditional to Modern.” The free exhibition held in the courtyard of the Honolulu Hale features works by several schools of ikebana and includes demonstrations open to the public. Visit www.honolulu.gov/moca for more information.
 

 


Family Fun

Mar. 25-28

Treat the family to a day out at the Honolulu Family Festival at Magic Island. It’s four days of E.K. Fernandez rides, games, food booths and live entertainment. Entrance to the festival is free; scrips for food and rides are available for purchase. The funds benefit the restoration of Ala Moana Beach Park. Visit honolulufamilyfestival.com.


Woodland Beauties

Mar. 27-Apr. 11

View the works the Hawaii Forest Industry Association’s 18th annual Hawaii Woodshow at the Honolulu Academy of Arts. Artisans from around the state will display their furniture and art. The pieces are hand-made from predominantly locally grown woods. Visit hawaiiforest.org

photos: Istock, and, courtesy of hawaii theatre, dolly kochi, hal lum, blue note records.

 

 

 

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