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World War II Warbirds Will Fly Over Oʻahu for an Aerial Parade This Weekend

We have the details, including when and where you can see these vintage planes go by.


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A Boeing-Stearman Model 75

This Boeing-Stearman Model 75 is one of more than a dozen planes that will fly over Oʻahu to commemorate of the end of wwii.
PHOTO: PETTY OFFICER 2ND CLASS JESSICA BLACKWELL, COURTESY OF NAVY PUBLIC AFFAIRS SUPPORT ELEMENT DETACHMENT HAWAIʻI

 

Sept. 2, 2020, marks 75 years since Japan signed papers of surrender on the deck of the USS Missouri, officially ending World War II. Plans to commemorate the occasion with special film showings, visits from out-of-state veterans and more have been scrapped (though you can still watch a livestream of the International Wreath Ceremony on Wednesday, Sept. 2), but one celebration will go on.

 

In early August, planes from around the nation arrived at Pearl Harbor. This weekend, Aug. 29 and Aug. 30, 16 WWII-era aircraft will fly in Legacy of Peace aerial parades over most of Oʻahu before the final flight on Sept. 2.

 

Here are the route maps and the estimated schedule for each of these events. Do note that the times listed below are the estimates of when the first plane will reach that point. But get comfortable because organizers say it may take as long as 40 minutes for the rest of the procession to pass over.

 

B-25 Mitchell

B-25 Mitchell.
PHOTO: PETTY OFFICER 2ND CLASS JESSICA BLACKWELL, COURTESY OF NAVY PUBLIC AFFAIRS SUPPORT ELEMENT DETACHMENT HAWAIʻI

 

Saturday, Aug. 29, 10–11 a.m. (estimated)

Legacy of Peace Aerial Parade

(Best seen from Central Oʻahu, North Shore, Windward and East Oʻahu)

 

10 a.m.: The first planes leave Wheeler Army Airfield in Wahiawā heading toward Waipahu. The final planes in the parade will be two Stearman biplanes.

10:05 a.m.: Lead plane reaches Waipahu, then goes to Aloha Stadium.

10:10 a.m.: Punchbowl then to Diamond Head.

10:16 a.m.: Makapuʻu on the way to Kāneʻohe.

10:20 a.m.: Marine Corps Base Hawaiʻi.

10:25 a.m.: Lāiʻe, then around the North Shore.

10:30 a.m.: Haleʻiwa Airfield with a return to Wheeler at 10:35 a.m.

 

Sunday, Aug. 30, 10–11 a.m. (estimated)

Legacy of Peace Aerial Parade Connecting the Bases of World War II

(Best seen from Central Oʻahu, Haleʻiwa, Leeward Oʻahu and the Pearl Harbor area)

 

10 a.m.: The first planes leave Wheeler Army Airfield toward Haleʻiwa Airfield. The final planes in the parade will be two Stearman biplanes.

10:07 a.m.: Kaʻena Point, then the parade heads down the Leeward coast.

10:13 a.m.: Kahe Power Plant.

10:16 a.m.: Waipahu and Waipiʻo, from there the planes go toward Pearl Harbor.

10:20 a.m.: Ford Island.

10:23 a.m.: Returns to Wheeler Army Airfield.

 

Wednesday, Sept. 2, 7:50–8:55 a.m. (estimated)

Official 75th Commemoration of the End of WWII

The route is designed so the warbirds fly over the USS Missouri at 8:10 a.m. (same path as Aug. 30).

 

7:50 a.m.: The lead planes depart Wheeler Army Airfield toward Haleʻiwa Airfield.

7:57 a.m.: Kaʻena Point, then down the Leeward Coast.

8:03 a.m.: Kahe Power Plant on the way to Waipahu.

8:06 a.m.: Waipahu and Waipiʻo.

8:10 a.m.: Ford Island.

8:13 a.m.: Lead planes return to Wheeler.

 

Find all the 75th WWII Commemoration of the End of WWII on 75thwwiicommemoration.org

 

 

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