North Shore's Surf Row: Where the pro surfers live


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(page 2 of 8)

Oakley House

When we climb the perilously steep stairs from the beach to this backyard, we’re struck by two things: One, the number of signs reminding guests to wash their feet (in four languages, no less) and two, its openness. There’s no fence along the beachfront. No gate, no hedges and no signs alerting us to dogs that bite.

Surfer Dustin Barca emerges from the house as soon as we arrive; he tells us Oakley has been renting here for years, since Andy Irons won his first Triple Crown a decade ago. It’s full of good memories for the team.

Compared to some of the other properties on this stretch of beach, the three-bedroom house is modest. There can be up to 15 people staying there, but Barca says they have to limit it, because crime is a problem. It’s a concern that’s echoed throughout the day, but definitely not reflected in Barca’s demeanor.

Visible surfboards: 18
Putting greens: 1
People at home: 2, including visiting surfer Jason Magallenes
Pets: 1 (Kapui, a dog whose stamina for playing dead is unparalleled)
Closest neighbor: Rumored to be the Target house. No one’s home next-door, but the number of beach towels bearing a red bull’s-eye seems to confirm.

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