Field Guide: King Street

On this little strip, learn to pray Shinto style or how to protect your pup from ticks.


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Photo: David Croxford


Daily Bread

If bread was separated into two categories, sweet and savory, we’d recommend sticking with the sweet side at this delightful bakery. The chefs keep things simple with a walnut loaf that is fluffy with a little crunch, and sweet pastries that aren’t too decadent and a little out of the ordinary, such as guava fan danishes. They’re heavenly on the inside and crispy on the outside. 1618 S. King St., 951-6634.


Photo: David Croxford

 

King Street Hospital
This animal haven was opened in September 2006 by Dr. Shelby Young Goo, who has been practicing veterinary medicine for 19 years, and Richard Fujie, who has 25 years under his belt. The duo decided to team up after previously working together in other veterinary clinics, allowing for “a good yin-yang thing,” says Young Goo. They care for your best friends from birth to death, and say they see mostly cats and dogs, but also get exotics, such as Jackson chameleons and chinchillas. 2016 S. King St., 951-7777, www.kingstreetpethospital.com.
 
 


Photo: David Croxford

 


Restaurant I-Naba



The minimalist décor—paper lanterns and austere sliding doors—matches I-Naba’s soba noodles, which are made daily with flour imported from Nagano. This place is a little pricey, but the soba is killer. The soba sets come with veggie shoyu rice, and an array of tsukemono (“pickled things”). The tempura—we recommend the pumpkin—is lightly fried, making it crispy on the outside while still tender on the inside. 1610 S. King St., 953-2070, www.inabahonolulu.com.

 

4. Did You Know?

 

How to pray Shinto style: (1) Bow two times; (2) Clap your hands two times; (3) bow one more time. The Hawaii Ishizuchi Shrine, 2020 S. King St.

 


 

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