Hawaii's Most Endangered Historic Places

Each year, we look for our state’s most endangered historic places through a partnership with the Historic Hawaii Foundation and the State Historic Preservation Division. The list is a call to action, but it’s also a way to appreciate the hidden treasures of our built environment. This year we see Kapahulu Avenue with new eyes, imagine the way plantation workers gathered in the 1900s and consider—if only for a moment—if an ugly building is worth saving.

(page 6 of 8)


photo: courtesy of gp pacific

 

His plans are to scrap the exterior of the building. “We’re going to take down the metal façade and replace that with a bluish glass curtain wall and put metal panels over the brick,” Hatcher said.

What can be done?

“It never occurred to me to keep it like it is, so I’m actually interested to hear anyone’s arguments to have it stay like it is.  I’d love to hear what someone has to say about it,” says Hatcher. Contact the developer at contact@gc-pacific.com. See the proposed condo plans queenemmaregency.com.

 


photo: kicka witte

Kapaia Swinging Bridge (Lihue, Kauai)

What is it?

Built in 1948, the Kapaia Swinging Bridge is a 125-foot-long suspension bridge with two tall, wooden towers anchored by steel cables. The last in a series of bridges used by plantation workers from the Kapaia Camps, footbridges over Kapaia stream have been used since the 1900s. Connecting the communities of Kapaia, Hanamaulu and Lihue, the Kapaia Swinging Bridge, and its more modest footbridge predecessors, is a historical crossroad of the plantation culture.

Related links:
Updates: A Look Back at Past Endangered Places

Have Feedback? Suggestions? Email us!

,November

Also in this issue: