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Liliha Moments

(page 4 of 4)

On Tong Society, Vineyard Boulevard In the afternoon light, the “double happiness” symbols on the On Tong Building’s main door reflect indoors. The motifs, perhaps, also represent the building’s main function. “It’s a place for people of the same Chinese province to come together as a community and support each other,” says Rep. Corrine Ching.

 

Market and Barber Shop, Liliha Street At Liliha Barber Shop, only one haircut can happen at a time. The space is tiny, with just enough room to accommodate a lone 1920s porcelain and metal chair. Its other facets are simple: Important phone numbers are written on the wall, and a sign with plastic white letters displays haircut prices: $12 for adults; $11 for children under 9 years old and men over 65.

 

Liliha Bakery, North Kuakini Street Established in 1950, Liliha Bakery is one of those classic L-shaped American-style diners that make you feel like you’ve traveled back in time. Every day from 2 a.m. until 10 p.m., expert bakers whip up made-from-scratch goods, including the bakery’s famous coco puffs (4,000 are sold each day). At its 18-seat diner counter, waitresses, more like family members than employees, serve local-style comfort food like loco moco, corned beef hash and grilled mahimahi sandwiches. Even better, it is open 24 hours a day (except Monday; it closes Sunday at 8 p.m. and reopens Tuesday at 6 a.m.).

 

Natsunoya Tea House, Makanani Drive  Bento anyone? Besides its food, and the fact that John Wayne filmed a movie scene at the location, Natsunoya Tea House is best known for two things: a) The incredible view overlooking Honolulu b) Before World War II, a Japanese spy used an upstairs room to report on happenings in Pearl Harbor. 

         

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