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Field Guide: Urban Pig Hunting


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photo: courtesy miles fukushima

Live traps

A good choice. There are two types: 1) box traps, which are useful for catching small numbers of pigs, and 2) corrals, which can be built to accomodate any number of pigs. Ensuring your trap is large enough to hold all of your pigs at once is key. Any pigs that get away will be on to you. They won’t stop messing up your yard, but they will never, ever fall for the trap. (Live traps also leave you the option of sparing the pig’s life and releasing it somewhere else, perhaps an ex-husband’s neighborhood.)
 

Game camera

A motion detector triggers the shutter when your pig appears, and the time and date are recorded. After gathering a few days of such data—voila—you have your pig’s schedule. Now you don’t have to wait in the tree all night long.
 

Outsourcing

Who are we kidding? You’re going to want to call in an expert to do the dirty work. Try the Oahu Pig Hunters Association (330-7788), which has about a dozen members who make house calls. Just keep in mind: you don’t kill it, you don’t get to eat it.               

 

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