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Written in Stone

An ambitious new book explores Hawaii’s masterworks in stone.


Published:

(page 2 of 2)


Photo: Douglas Peebles

3. Kawaiahao Church, Honolulu, 1842

“The rulers of Oahu donated stone, lime and timber. It is believed that Captain Don Francisco Marin’s son, Manini, was on the planning committee and he enlisted Ferreira, a master stonemason and armory specialist, to play a major role in the construction project. Coral was recommended because of its availability and economy. A plaque on the church reads, The building materials of the sanctuary were not easily accessible. The huge coral slabs had to be quarried underwater, and each weighed more than 1,000 pounds. Native Hawaiians dove 10 to 20 feet to hand chisel these pieces from the reef. The physically and spiritually strong hauled some 14,000 of the slabs to this, their final destination.’”

—Franklin J. Wong, AIA. Franklin Wong & Associates

 

 
Photo: Douglas Peebles

4. Stones from the Honolulu Fort, 1816, now lining Honolulu Harbor

“After demolition in 1857, the fort’s walls provided the materials for a harbor front retaining wall, 14 feet high and seven feet thick, to reclaim 17 to 22 acres of tidal land. A portion of this wall can still be seen off the small parking lot at Pier 12.”

—Scott Cheever

 

  

 
Photo: Douglas Peebles

5. Wailuku Elementary School, Maui, 1904

“Dickey and Newcomb, architects, May 21, 1904. The stone entry porch provides light and ventilation to classrooms along a T-shaped corridor. Diagonal placement of stones at the base of the outlying walls is reminiscent of niho, or teeth, from Hawaiian stone building tradition.”

 

 

 

 
Photo: Douglas Peebles

 

6. Mookini Heiau, Kohala, Big Island

“Mookini Heiau is said to be born of the religious order of

Pa'ao, the Kahuna Nui from Tahiti, who instituted a new religious order in Hawaii sometime around the 12th century. … At this prominent heiau acts of purification would be performed, and at times a living person would be offered as a mohai, or sacred offering. … It is the valleys, mountaintops and multitudes of generations of native people who have made Kohala their home, for literally translated, Mookini is the living representation of 40 generations.’”

—Pohaku (Thomas Kealiiahonui Stone III)


 

 

 

 

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Honolulu Magazine March 2017
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