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Artist Kupihea Romero

Strong Work: Artist Kupihea Romero stands with his pair of sculptures entitled “Kino Waa,” currently on display at the Honolulu Academy of Arts.



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Photo: Mark Arbeit

Artist Kupihea Romero stands with his pair of sculptures entitled “Kino Waa,” currently on display at the Honolulu Academy of Arts’ biennial Artists of Hawaii exhibition. The title translates literally as “canoe body,” and Romero says he sees many parallels between canoes and humans. “The Hawaiian canoe has the same labeling of its parts as our body does,” Romero says. “It has a head, nose, ears, hips, shoulders, the feet. The canoe not only carried my ancestors physically to their new home, it also carried them spiritually, mentally. The kino needed to be strong.” The Academy exhibition runs through Sept. 25, honoluluacademy.org. See more on Romero at kupiheahawaiianart.com.

 

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