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These Japanese Amulets Might Bring You Good Luck and Fortune in 2017

Hawai‘i locals incorporate Japanese traditions in their new year’s celebrations.


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Japanese new year traditions

Photo: Courtesy of Hawai‘i Kotohira Jinsha—Hawai‘i Dazaifu Tenmangu

 

The new year is the most important holiday in Japan, where it’s celebrated for three days. It’s no wonder many of its associated traditions have been incorporated into local Hawai‘i culture, including purchasing omamori—amulets or talismans that bring luck and protection—and fortunes written on strips of paper, called omikuji, from shrines and temples. Many people choose to fold their fortunes and tie them to a pine tree or metal wires (as seen here at Hawai‘i Kotohira Jinsha—Hawai‘i Dazaifu Tenmangu in Kalihi-Pālama), which is said to strengthen the positive fortunes and lessen the negative ones.

 

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Honolulu Magazine October 2017
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