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Astounding Honolulu

Weird, strange and intriguing things you didn't know about our Islands.

(page 6 of 7)

Left Hanging

The last civilian hung for a crime in Honolulu was Myles Fukunaga in on Nov. 19, 1929. The son of a plantation worker, Fukunaga kidnapped and murdered the son of a Hawaiian Trust official. Fukunaga signed a ransom note for $10,000 “Three Kings” to make it look like the child was kidnapped by a gang. It didn’t work. The last military execution in Honolulu was in 1947. Army private Garlon Mickles, 19, was hanged for beating and raping a woman. His last request was that his mother be told that he “died like a man.” (True).   

 


Photo: David Croxford

Strange But True

The Makiki Christian Church (above) was modeled after Japan’s Kochi Castle, built in 1603. (True). The Kochi Castle was modeled after the “Castle Hole” at mini-golf park off Highway 95 in Jacksonville, Florida. (Questionable).

 

Are You Freakin' Kidding Me?

Don’t believe everything you see on the Internet about Honolulu. Here are a few allegations going viral:

— All citizens here must own a boat.
— All girls under the age of 12 must own a grass skirt and take hula lessons.
— It’s illegal to own a mongoose without a permit.
— It’s against the law to put pennies in your ear or appear in public wearing only swimming trunks. Wait. I think those two might be true.

 

What's In A Name:

Western explorers liked to name stuff that the local inhabitants had already named. For instance, Capt. William Brown accidentally came across Honolulu Harbor in 1795 in the British ship Jackal and named it “Fair Haven” even though the Hawaiians already had a name for it: “Kou.” “Fair Haven” turned out to be a somewhat ironical name because Capt. Brown was shortly attacked and killed there by King Kalanikupule.


Photo: Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

 

 

Something I Bet You Didn't Know:

Punahou graduate and archeologist Hiram Bingham III discovered the Peruvian ruins at Machu Picchu in 1911. He was the grandson of the founder of Punahou School and was perhaps inspiration for the fictional character Indiana Jones.

 

 

 


All-Girl Gecko Action

I write about geckos a lot, but this is my favorite discovery. A scientist friend told me that just about all geckos are girls. And because they are parthenogenic, they can lay fertilized eggs on their own. They don’t need the boy geckos! I think I understand why boy geckos are clinically depressed and spend their time hanging out inside mostly empty beer cans.

 

 

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,February

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