Your Guide to the Perfect Weekend in Honolulu: Dec. 6–9, 2018

Two star-studded concerts, one night market and a tree lighting in Kaimukī.


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Guns N’ Roses

PHOTO: courtesy of guns n’ roses

 

Guns N’ Roses

Saturday, Dec. 8, at 6 p.m.

If heavy head-banging, belting electric guitar riffs and legendary American rock is your jam, catch the ’80s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees Guns N’ Roses at the Aloha Stadium for an evening of heavy metal from the pros. Hear the powerhouse vocals of Axl Rose live as the band performs timeless hits “Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door” and “Sweet Child O’ Mine” to Hawai‘i’s diehard hard rock fans.

$39.50–$250 Aloha Stadium, 99-500 Salt Lake Blvd., ʻAiea. For more information and to purchase tickets, go here.

 

Eagles and Jack Johnson

Friday, Dec. 7, at 7 p.m.

Two music superstars join for one unforgettable show, with North Shore native Jack Johnson kicking off the evening with the signature ultra mellow sounds and feel-good vibes we love him for. Then, one of the world’s best-selling bands in history will take the stage to perform some of its greatest hits, including “Hotel California,” “Desperado” and “Heartache Tonight.”

$79.50 and up, Aloha Stadium, 99-500 Salt Lake Blvd., ʻAiea. For more information and to purchase tickets, go here.

 

SEE ALSO: 7 Concerts in Honolulu to Catch in December 2018

 

Waikīkī Makeke

photo: courtesy of indah designs

 

Waikīkī Mākeke

Sunday, Dec. 9, 4 to 8 p.m.

Unlike the massive holiday expos taking place this year, this Sunday’s Waikīkī Mākeke at the ‘Ohana Waikīkī East pool deck and adjacent meeting room will feature a curated lineup of local pop-ups catered to the stylish, artsy bunch. The night market’s 20-plus Hawai‘i artists, designers and merchants will include favorites such as Indah Designs, Manaola Hawai‘i, Matt Bruening, Salt Liko and Salvage Public, plus several other brands to discover.

Free admission, ‘Ohana Waikīkī East Hotel, 150 Ka‘iulani Ave. For more information, go here.

 

Kaimukī Christmas Parade and Tree Lighting

Thursday, Dec. 6, 6 to 8 p.m.

A neighborhood tradition for years, the annual Kaimukī parade returns this Thursday to bring some holiday cheer to Wai‘alae Avenue. Starting at St. Louis School, a 40-plus procession of community groups (which include school marching bands, local businesses, dogs, clowns, legislators and Santa himself, to name a few) will head 1.1 miles up the street, ending at Koko Head Avenue, where the official Kaimukī tree lighting will take place at Pu‘u O Kaimukī Park.

Free, Wai‘alae Avenue from St. Louis School to Koko Head Avenue. For more information, go here.

 

 

Looking for more things to do? Check out our events calendar.

 

Looking for fun new ways to experience the city? HONOLULU’s got you covered with HNLTix, your brand-new local resource for all things social—fundraisers, concerts, comedy shows, expos and everything in between. Discover your next can’t-miss event, share your favorites with friends, or promote your own event and sell tickets online. To see what’s coming up next in Honolulu, visit HNLTix.com.

READ MORE STORIES BY MARISA HEUNG

 

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