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Big Cleanup Effort Keeps Kahuku Clean and Country

The formerly endangered Kahuku Point gets a cleanup, thanks to a volunteer workday this past weekend.


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The formerly endangered Kahuku Point gets a clean-up, thanks to a volunteer workday this past weekend.

Photo: Stephanie Hsu

 

One of O‘ahu’s last undeveloped shorelines was saved from development this past October, thanks to a $45 million conservation deal by the state of Hawai‘i, the City and County of Honolulu, The U.S. Army and The Trust for Public Land, keeping 628 coastal acres of Kahuku Point open in perpetuity for wildlife and public access.

 

The formerly endangered Kahuku Point gets a clean-up, thanks to a volunteer workday this past weekend.

PHOTO: JOHN BILDERBACK

 

Of course, once you’ve saved a piece of coastline, you’ve got to take care of it. This past weekend, a group of more than 120 volunteers did just that, spending a day at Kahuku Point eradicating invasive species, planting native plants and removing debris from the beach.

 

The formerly endangered Kahuku Point gets a clean-up, thanks to a volunteer workday this past weekend.

PHOTO: JOHN BILDERBACK

 

Called “A Day on the Land,” the effort was organized by TPL, in cooperation with the Point’s permanent stewards, The North Shore Community Land Trust, as a way to connect the community to this beautiful natural landscape.

 

The formerly endangered Kahuku Point gets a clean-up, thanks to a volunteer workday this past weekend.

Photo: John Bilderback

 

“Kahuku Point is truly a special place,” says Gregg Takara, TPL’s advisory board chair. “The Trust for Public Land is so grateful to the state, city, and Army funding partners that contributed $45 million to conserve this area, to the landowner Turtle Bay Resort that agreed to work with us, and to the steadfast North Shore community members and organizations that supported protecting this coastline. We are pleased that the community’s vision of a wild and restored coastline is bearing fruit.”

 

For a full calendar of community workdays or to make a donation, call 524-8694, visit tpl.org/hawaii or contact Leslie Uptain at leslie.uptain@tpl.org.

 

Read More Stories by Michael Keany

 

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