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Finding Beretania

The people, businesses, landmarks, history and food that make this street such an integral part of Honolulu’s cityscape.

(page 6 of 6)

photo BY David Croxford

The Gun Source

Shotguns and rifles stand in tall, neat rows along the back wall of The Gun Source. Pistols and revolvers fill the glass cases, and pepper spray and gun paraphernalia hang on aisle hooks. While the firepower may intimidate newcomers, owner Anthony Lee welcomes even the most gun-shy customers. Whether for self-defense, law enforcement or hunting, Lee provides each buyer with information on gun safety classes, which you need to take obtain a gun permit. He also caters to hard-core gun enthusiasts, offering in-house repair services and special orders on hard-to-find firearms. 2357 S. Beretania St., 944-3850.



Anna Bannana’s manager, Rick Kubach, deftly handles nightlife staples such as pool tables.

photo BY Sergio Goe



Anna Bannana’s Bar

This bar, with its grimy, monkey-painting-covered exterior, has been misspelling “bananas” since 1969. What keeps people coming back when nothing has changed since the ’70s? The casual, friendly atmosphere, where you can drink a beer and relax among employees who know your name. They’ve recently started dipping into the art world to attract new patrons. “We have a monthly poetry gathering on the first Tuesday of each month,” says manager Rick Kubach. “It’s really popular; we’ve even had people fly in from San Francisco for it.” Perhaps they’ll read some of Shakespeare’s poems; the famous poet’s name was spelled 99 different ways by himself and his colleagues. 2440 S. Beretania St., 946-5190.



FAST FACT Beretania is actually a Hawaiian street name. What does it mean? Britain. Correct way to pronounce it? Bay-ray-tah-knee-yah. Good luck getting that to catch on.

(left) In this undated photo from the State Archives, a horse-drawn trolley passes the gates of Washington Place (on the right). (middle) Paradise of the Pacific, predecessor to HONOLULU Magazine, once called Beretania Street home. In 1925, it set up shop at 424 Beretania St. (right) Fort Street Mall was once just plain Fort Street. This State Archives photo, taken from Beretania Street sometime between 1900 and 1904, shows the Coyne Furniture Co. Today, the building houses part of Hawaii Pacific University. On the left, you can spy the Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace, the oldest cathedral in continuous use in the United States.
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,August

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