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Your Guide to the Perfect Weekend: April 7–9, 2017

A lineup of the weekend's best events.


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This month’s Weekend Picks are brought to you by: Honolulu Cookie Co.


This weekend, bring out your inner child with a totally free screening of a certain Disney animated movie at the Polynesian Cultural Center, a weekend-long event celebrating anime, and an expo featuring anything and everything to do with having fun in the sun. Or, if you insist on being an adult, Hawai‘i Opera Theatre’s pop-up event offers a chance to shop all things sophisticated—couture, brand-name shoes and accessories, art and more.

 

Kawaii Kon

Photo: Barrett Ishida

 

Kawaii Kon

Friday, April 7 through Sunday, April 9

Is the word baka part of your regular vocab? Do you know the difference between tsundere, kuudere and dandere? If so, you’ll feel right at home with the crowd taking over the Hawai‘i Convention Center this weekend. Kawaii Kon, Hawai‘i’s largest anime convention, spans three days and draws thousands to Waikīkī each year. Throughout the weekend, people of varying degrees of fandom—from casual viewers of Attack on Titan on Netflix to cosplayers who spend the entire year prepping homemade costumes—flock to the convention center to meet celebrity Japanese and American voice actors, artists, famous YouTubers, fashion designers and music artists. This year, the Kawaii Kon team offers a Kawaii Kon app to make planning and navigating a cinch. Even if anime isn’t your thing, this family-friendly event has all the elements (costumes, comics, video games, cartoons) to tickle your kids’ fancies—and, hey, it could even bring out a little otaku in you, too.

$53–$73, Hawai‘i Convention Center, 1801 Kalākaua Ave. For more information and to purchase tickets, go here.

 

Moana Movie Night on the Lawn

Friday, April 7 at 7:30 p.m.

Hawai‘i’s obsession with Disney’s newest animated movie, Moana, still runs as red-hot as lava with no signs of cooling down. This Friday evening, the Polynesian Cultural Center gives you another chance to watch the sea-voyaging princess Moana in action (and, consequentially, get Auli‘i Cravalho’s “How Far I’ll Go” on mental replay for another three months) with a free showing on its lawn. The center will also feature a Moana selfie spot, lei craft kits and hula performance, as well as an appearance by Dani Hickman, author of local children’s book Pono, the Garden Guardian, who will be there for a reading and book signing an hour before the screening. If Lā‘ie sounds like a bit of a voyage, just ask yourself: “How far will I go?”

Free, Polynesian Cultural Center, 55-370 Kamehameha Highway, Lā‘ie. For more information on the Polynesian Cultural Center, go here.

 

Hawaii Ocean Expo

Photo: Travis Okimoto

 

Hawai‘i Ocean Expo

Saturday, April 8, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday, April 9, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

In the market for a gyotaku fish print? Fishing lures? Or, perhaps you’re just interested in learning more about Hawai‘i’s ocean culture. The annual Hawai‘i Ocean Expo this weekend has it all, hosting dozens of booths with vendors offering products and information on anything and everything related to our Hawaiian waters. Shop apparel, food, jewelry, fishing equipment, surf and SUP boards and much more. While you’re there, make sure to enter for the chance to win a 30-foot boat (the perfect accessory to go with those new fishing lures you’ve been eyeing)—but, even if you don’t, the expo’s other entertainment, prizes, giveaways, poke contest and lots more will keep you hanging around. This year, Hawai‘i Ocean Expo will also host the awards ceremony for the GT Masters Fishing Tournament, taking place on Sunday at noon.

$4–$6, Neal S. Blaisdell Exhibition Hall, 777 Ward Ave. For more information on the Hawai‘i Ocean Expo, go here.

 

ACT II: A Fashion Reprise Pop-Up

Saturday, April 7, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, April 8, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Opening night at the opera often evokes images of society’s high-class elites in (what we imagine as) their version of painting the town red: sophisticated wives in full-length gowns and shimmering jewels, clean-shaven husbands in classic tuxedos, perhaps a mysterious, dark figure loitering in the shadows behind a cape and mask. Even you’re not part of the social upper-crust, Hawai‘i Opera Theatre gives you an opportunity to at least dress like you are with ACT II: A Fashion Reprise. During the pop-up, held at Hawai‘i Opera Plaza, guests can shop luxury goods such as couture, designer apparel, accessories, shoes, art and more. All items are donated by supporters of the theater, and many are in brand-new condition. If you’d like to check out the inventory beforehand, Hawai‘i Opera Theatre will hold a special preview evening on Friday from 5 to 9 p.m. A $30 ticket to the preview includes pūpū and wine—but space is limited, so we suggest you RSVP as soon as possible to Courtney Coston (596-732, ext. 200).

Free, Hawai‘i Opera Plaza, 848 S. Beretania St., Suite 310. For more information on the event, go here.

 

Looking for more things to do this month? Click here for more events.

 

READ MORE STORIES BY MARISA HEUNG

 

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