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Hawaii Construction Boom: New Developments Coming to Honolulu, North Shore, Central, West and Windward Oahu

New developments are changing the face of Honolulu—find out what’s coming.


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(page 2 of 6)

AIEA

Live Work Play Aiea

Aiea rising

If developer Robertson Properties Group gets its way—and a zoning variance raising the height limit from 60 feet to 350 feet—a 14-acre “urban village” will sprout from the site of the old Kamehameha Drive-In Theater, across the street from Pearlridge Center. Can you picture the old Kam Swap Meet filled with 1,500 new residences and a multitude of offices and stores? The neighbors can, and they see more congestion.

Moanalua Road at Ka Onohi Street, 5 buildings, 150-350 feet

 

KAKAAKO

801 South St.

Build ‘em, Danno

Owner-occupants (versus investors) got the first crack at the 635 units of Tower A, which went up for sale last spring and sold out immediately. While obviously popular with buyers, the twin towers have drawn protests from neighbors losing their views, housing advocates raising questions of affordability and historic preservationists objecting to the partial demolition of what was The Honolulu Advertiser building. Developer Marshall Hung razed the structure that once housed the newspaper’s printing presses and more recently served as a soundstage for the TV show Hawaii Five-0.

$300K–$700K, Two 46-story towers, Tower A 2015, Tower B 2016
 

Symphony Honolulu

Entertainment central

The Kakaako development plan envisions an urban community where people can walk to their places of work and play. There’s no telling where the residents of this rapidly rising tower will work, but they’ll need only cross the street to catch a concert—or whatever else the Blaisdell Center has to offer. Sixty buyers queued up on the first day of sales last summer, five months before developer OliverMcMillan Pacific Rim LLC broke ground. The first seven floors of the building will be taken up by parking and commercial spaces, including showrooms for luxury carmakers such as Ferrari, Lotus and Lamborghini.

Kapiolani Blvd. at Ward Ave, $500K–$800K, 40 stories, 2015
 

Keauhou Place &  Keauhou Lane

Mixing it up

Everybody knew that the Eat the Street food trucks weren’t going to have their own city block forever. Landowner Kamehameha Schools envisions filling the block with a variety of housing types, including townhomes, lofts, live-work spaces, rentals and a tower with 400 or so units. The tower is called Keauhou Place, while a six-story mid-rise, which will have restaurants and retail on the ground floor, is called Keauhou Lane. Developer Stanford Carr hopes to break ground later this year.

555 South St., 40 stories + 6 stories, 2016
 

Symphony Honolulu.
Keauhou Place & Keauhou Lane.

 

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